RAISED FLOWER BED PICTURES : BED PICTURES


RAISED FLOWER BED PICTURES : BRIDESMAID HAIR FLOWERS : DAHLIA BRIDAL BOUQUET.



Raised Flower Bed Pictures





raised flower bed pictures






    flower bed
  • flowerbed: a bed in which flowers are growing

  • A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation, and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. The garden can incorporate both natural and man-made materials.

  • A garden plot in which flowers are grown





    pictures
  • Describe (someone or something) in a certain way

  • Represent (someone or something) in a photograph or picture

  • Form a mental image of

  • (pictural) pictorial: pertaining to or consisting of pictures; "pictorial perspective"; "pictorial records"

  • (picture) a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"

  • (picture) visualize: imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy"





    raised
  • located or moved above the surround or above the normal position; "a raised design"; "raised eyebrows"

  • Elevated to a higher position or level; lifted

  • (of bread or pastry) Made with a raising agent such as yeast

  • brocaded: embellished with a raised pattern created by pressure or embroidery; "brocaded silk"; "an embossed satin"; "embossed leather"; "raised needlework"; "raised metalwork"

  • raised(a): increased in amount or degree; "raised temperature"

  • Embossed; in relief











raised flower bed pictures - Wallmonkeys Peel




Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Raised Flower Beds - 18"W x 12"H Removable Graphic


Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Raised Flower Beds - 18"W x 12"H Removable Graphic



WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.










83% (16)





A closer view of 2 raised beds and path in between




A closer view of 2 raised beds and path in between





You may ask why are the plants planted haphazardly, and not in rows like a proper garden?

One reason is this is a test bed, and the goal is to see what grows at all, grows well, or not in this soil, so often I have only one to five of each plant.

The other reason is that if you have the plants all grouped together (called a monoculture), the bugs that eat them, when they finish one plant off, they just have to roll over and start munching on the next one. But think if they have to go walking longer distances looking for the plant they like to eat, they have more chance of getting nailed by a predator (there are lots of spiders in that bed, for example, some big ones, too) before they find another plant. And, the Lemon Balm or mint has more chance of throwing them off the scent with it's strong odor.

The 3rd and best reason is because diversity works in your favor in nature and in the garden. If you think of the garden food chain: plants (my allies) are eaten by herbivore bugs (my enemies), which are eaten by predator bugs (my allies). The higher you go up the food chain, because of the Second Law of Thermodynamics (no energy transfer is 100% efficient) means that fewer species are living off the lower level on the food chain, there are more omnivores the higher you get. "Lower food-source diversity at higher trophic levels leads most carnivore species into omnivory." (Edible Forest Gardens, Vol 1) Therefore, if we increase plant species diversity (in any given area) there will be an increase in the generalist predators, which are omnivores eating whatever they can get, which gets us redundancy in function, which will help control the herbivores more consistently.

So, since there are more enemy bug species then ally bug species, even if more types of plants attracts more enemy bugs to eat them, this diversityalso attracts more generalist predators who will eat any enemy bug they find.

A study of Swiss Vineyards found that with increased botanical diversity in the vineyard, insect diversity increased, but favored the predators much more than the pests. "The predators were able to use the diverse resources of the plant community, including pollen, nectar, shelter, and overwintering sites, to meet their diverse needs, so they were available to reduce the pest-insect populations. Many of the additional arthropods in the diverse vineyards were spiders, which were attracted not by specific plant species but by the structural features of the diversified ecosystem. More plants meant more variation in texture, height, and density, allowing more niches for these generalist predators, whether web builders or hunters." (Ibid) ... The bed in my picture here will attract more predator species when the plants grow out more and when they are touching each other, I suppose.

You just have to look at the natural forest and this all makes sense. No monoculture, now rows of identical plants, much diversity. (Much biomass, but not much fruit or nuts, either, but that's where humans come in, planting and selecting for the highest-producing trees, shrubs and herbs.)

So, why don't I just spray to kill all the bugs? (After all I just explained, how could you ask that?! Aren't spiders your favorite critters now?)

Answer: 1) there are too many niches in nature to be filled, there is always some bug that will get to your plants, and when they come, they will come in hordes, because the spray killed off all the predator bugs, too, then you have to spray more, it's vicious cycle 2) killing them means there is temporarily no food for the predator bugs (my allies, who I want around), who will then leave town 3) pesticides kill the organisms in the soil that decompose plant matter which recycles nutrients for future plants. If you don't have this you have to use more fertilizer, another vicious cycle.

Also, interestingly, since most plant matter is not eaten but decomposes, you see that most of the energy embodied in a plant goes underground. There is an entire food chain below the surface (like bacteria, fungus), the top of which are flies, larvae, beetles that live in the leaf litter. These are eaten by above-ground predators (my allies). For example, birds get 80% of their diet from insects that derive their energy from the underground food chain. But, when leaf herbivore populations explode, the birds shift their eating to take advantage of this new food source. By keeping the birds fed in normal years, you ensure the birds are around to take care of the herbivore explosions. So, maintaining the soil food chain is crucial, so it is harmful to kill the organisms at the bottom of the soil food chain with pesticides and herbicides (and inorganic fertilizers). Organic farming feeds not only the plants, but also the entire ecosystem.

Day Lily (plant at far right) beneficial uses:

Edible flowers, fresh or dried (excellent)
Edible young shoots (fair, can cause digestive upset if overconsume).
Edible tubers,











Rainny Day




Rainny Day





"Everything that is new or uncommon raises a pleasure in the imagination, because it fills the soul with an agreeable surprise, gratifies its curiosity, and gives it an idea of which it was not before possessed." - Joseph Addison

ISO 100 - 50mm - f/3.2 - 1/250 - T1i
ISO 100 - 32mm - f/2.8 - 1/400 - Rebel XT

I bought my very first camera last July and started off completely green with photography. I had mused from time to time over the past few years about trying out photography. I borrowed a friends camera twice to see if I would enjoy it, and from that point there has been no going back! Over the past year I have done alot. I took over 10,000 photos from various holidays in Hawaii and Australia, fun camps with Students from my community, fun outings, hikes and other events. I quickly outstripped my old Rebel XT and upgraded to the T1i! :)

This was probably the best recreational thing I have ever done other than start playing soccer when I was 5. My favorite thing about getting into photography is that my whole world has changes. You everything different. I find that beautify can be found most anywhere. These two photos were taken on ugly days with lots of rain and overcast skies. Yet there was some simple beauty to found in even the most mundane wet plant and soggy rock bed. :) How cool is that. I get to have fun with some cool tech that changes the way I see my life! I never would have considered myself an artsy and or creative person, but taking pictures has really brought out that side of me.

I am looking forward to more exciting years of learning and appreciating the hidden world around me! :)









raised flower bed pictures








raised flower bed pictures




How to Create the Perfect Summer Garden






This book discusses how to create and maintain a summer garden. Contents Include: Article 1: Gardening
Article 2: Gardening Plants
Article 3: Choosing the Best Plants for Your Garden
Article 4: Picking a Healthy Plant
Article 5: Planning Your Summer Garden
Article 6: Other Factors in Garden Creation
Article 7: Furnishing Your Summer Garden
Article 8: Make Your Summer Garden Sizzle
Article 9: Making Your Summer Garden Grow
Article 10: Maintaining a Summer Garden
Article 11: Landscaping Your Summer Garden
Article 12: Decorating Your Summer Garden
Article 13: Summer Garden Pitfalls
Article 14: Planting a Summer Garden
Article 15: Versatility in Your Summer Garden
Article 16: An Organic Summer Garden Experience
Article 17: Is a Raised Summer Garden Right for You?
Article 18: Creating a Raised Bed
Article 19: Summer Gardens for Small Spaces
Article 20: Building a Summer Garden with Kids
Article 21: Flower Gardening
Article 22: Colorful Summer Garden Flowers
Article 23: Butterfly Gardening
Article 24: More About Butterfly Gardening
Article 25: Extending the Life of Your Summer Garden
Article 26: Safe Pest Control Tips
Article 27: Helpful Information About Natural Insecticides
Article 28: How to Use Non-plant Natural Insecticide
Article 29: Gardening Advice
Article 30: Seven Gardening By the Yard Tips
Article 31: Gardening Products
Article 32: Gardening Equipment
Article 33: Gardening Gloves
Article 34: Gardening Book

This book discusses how to create and maintain a summer garden. Contents Include: Article 1: Gardening
Article 2: Gardening Plants
Article 3: Choosing the Best Plants for Your Garden
Article 4: Picking a Healthy Plant
Article 5: Planning Your Summer Garden
Article 6: Other Factors in Garden Creation
Article 7: Furnishing Your Summer Garden
Article 8: Make Your Summer Garden Sizzle
Article 9: Making Your Summer Garden Grow
Article 10: Maintaining a Summer Garden
Article 11: Landscaping Your Summer Garden
Article 12: Decorating Your Summer Garden
Article 13: Summer Garden Pitfalls
Article 14: Planting a Summer Garden
Article 15: Versatility in Your Summer Garden
Article 16: An Organic Summer Garden Experience
Article 17: Is a Raised Summer Garden Right for You?
Article 18: Creating a Raised Bed
Article 19: Summer Gardens for Small Spaces
Article 20: Building a Summer Garden with Kids
Article 21: Flower Gardening
Article 22: Colorful Summer Garden Flowers
Article 23: Butterfly Gardening
Article 24: More About Butterfly Gardening
Article 25: Extending the Life of Your Summer Garden
Article 26: Safe Pest Control Tips
Article 27: Helpful Information About Natural Insecticides
Article 28: How to Use Non-plant Natural Insecticide
Article 29: Gardening Advice
Article 30: Seven Gardening By the Yard Tips
Article 31: Gardening Products
Article 32: Gardening Equipment
Article 33: Gardening Gloves
Article 34: Gardening Book










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